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Reinforcer substitutability implications for the assessment and treatment of stereotypic self-injury by Bridget A. Shore

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Published .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Bridget A. Shore
The Physical Object
Paginationvii, 73 leaves :
Number of Pages73
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24733094M
OCLC/WorldCa33832569

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The concept of reinforcer substitutability proposes a continuum of interactions among reinforcers in a given situation. At one end of this continuum, reinforcers are substitutable, with one reinforcer being readily traded for another. We conducted an analysis of reinforcers that were substitutable with those produced by self-injurious behavior (SIB).Cited by: An analysis of reinforcer substitutability using object manipulation and self-injury as competing responses. REINFORCER SUBSTITUTABILITY: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE ASSESSMENT AND TREATMENT OF STEREOTYPIC SELF-INJURY By Bridget A. Shore August, Chair: Brian A. Iwata Major Department: Psychology The concept of reinforcer substitutability proposes that in any given situation, a continuum of possible interactions among reinforcers can exist. At one end of. Three experiments involving three adults with profound mental retardation whose self-injurious behavior (SIB) was maintained by automatic reinforcement, examined interactions between stereotypic SIB and the manipulation of objects that appeared to provide substitutable sources of reinforcement. Attempts to reduce SIB using the preferred objects as reinforcers were by:

The range of reinforcer interactions found in these studies is more readily accommodated and predicted when behavior-analytic models of choice consider issues of substitutability. New insights are gained into such areas as eating and drinking, electrical brain stimulation, temporal separation of choice alternatives, behavior therapy, drug use Cited by: The substitutability of reinforcers. Green L, Freed DE. Substitutability is a construct borrowed from microeconomics that describes a continuum of possible interactions among the reinforcers in a Cited by: The book consists of three parts. Part I is introductory and problem ori-ented. We focus on the simplest aspects of reinforcement learning and on its main distinguishing features. One full chapter is devoted to introducing the reinforcement learning problem whose solution we explore in the rest of the book. A negative reinforcer also strengthens a behavior, but it does so by eliminating something that is unwanted. For example, in the Skinner’s box, if a mild current were turned on in the electric grid that runs through the floor of the box, and if this current were turned off only when the rat depressed the lever, turning off the current would be an example of an aversive stimulus serving as a.

Social Reinforcers Classroom based Reinforcers Activity Reinforcers Material Reinforcers Edible Reinforcers Hi-5’s Class party Clapping hands Stickers Sweets: Hugs Computer time Hide and seek Bubbles Candy Kisses Choice time Peek-a-boo Balloons Gummy candies Facial expressions Feed class pet Brushing hair Balloon pump M&MsFile Size: KB. The concept of reinforcer substitutability proposes a continuum of interactions among reinforcers in a given situation. At one end of this continuum, reinforcers are substitutable, with one reinforcer being readily traded for by: Inappropriate The list (including its title or description) facilitates illegal activity, or contains hate speech or ad hominem attacks on a fellow Goodreads member or author. Spam or Self-Promotional The list is spam or self-promotional. Incorrect Book The list contains an incorrect book (please specify the title of the book). Details *. Generally, positive reinforcement is regarded as a reward. Negative reinforcement for its part is equal to punishment. However, in contemporary psychology punishment and negative reinforcement are not synonyms, as they provide two different approaches to controlling certain behavior patterns.